Discussion:
Pronunciation question
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Arthur T.
2017-04-14 06:10:27 UTC
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Here's a short alphabetized list of words. I'm curious which
you think rhyme with each other. So as not to prejudice you, I'll
give my answers later, along with my reason for asking.

beg
craig
egg
greg
keg
leg
meg
peg
plague
vague
--
Arthur T. - ar23hur "at" pobox "dot" com
x***@gmail.com
2017-04-14 12:26:56 UTC
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Post by Arthur T.
Here's a short alphabetized list of words. I'm curious which
you think rhyme with each other. So as not to prejudice you, I'll
give my answers later, along with my reason for asking.
beg
craig
egg
greg
keg
leg
meg
peg
plague
vague
The way I pronounce them: "Plague" rhymes with "vague". All the others rhyme with each other, but not with "plague" or "vague"
Lyda Eubanks
2017-04-14 14:02:59 UTC
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Post by Arthur T.
Here's a short alphabetized list of words. I'm curious which
you think rhyme with each other. So as not to prejudice you, I'll
give my answers later, along with my reason for asking.
beg
craig
egg
greg
keg
leg
meg
peg
plague
vague
--
Arthur T. - ar23hur "at" pobox "dot" com
I usually would lump beg, egg, greg, keg, leg, meg, and peg together in how i say them, and plague and vague together. Craig sticks out as the odd one for me, because I was taught to pronounce it with the 'a' sounding similar to lag or brag.
Mark Mandel
2017-04-15 05:43:14 UTC
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Lyda, are you thinking of "crag" ("a steep or rugged cliff or rock face")? This word is the man's name "Craig", with "ai" in the middle. It's confusing because Arthur didn't capitalize it.

Mark
Post by Lyda Eubanks
I usually would lump beg, egg, greg, keg, leg, meg, and peg together in how i say them, and plague and vague together. Craig sticks out as the odd one for me, because I was taught to pronounce it with the 'a' sounding similar to lag or brag.
Tim Merrigan
2017-04-14 14:16:42 UTC
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Post by Arthur T.
Here's a short alphabetized list of words. I'm curious which
you think rhyme with each other. So as not to prejudice you, I'll
give my answers later, along with my reason for asking.
beg
craig
egg
greg
keg
leg
meg
peg
plague
vague
All but the last two rhyme with each other (single syllables ending
with "eg"), and the last two rhyme with each other (single syllables
ending with (long) "ag").
--
I pledge allegiance to the Constitution of the United States of America,
and to the republic which it established, one nation, from many peoples,
promising liberty and justice for all.
Feel free to use the above variant pledge in your own postings.

Tim Merrigan
Gary McGath
2017-04-14 15:05:23 UTC
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Post by Arthur T.
Here's a short alphabetized list of words. I'm curious which
you think rhyme with each other. So as not to prejudice you, I'll
give my answers later, along with my reason for asking.
beg
craig
egg
greg
keg
leg
meg
peg
plague
vague
I would rhyme "craig," plague," and "vague" together, and put all the
others in a second rhyming group. I say "craig" with a slightly shorter
sound than the other two, but the difference isn't enough to disqualify
it as a rhyme.

I'm from New England, in case this is a regional issue.
--
Gary McGath http://www.mcgath.com
Lee Gold XP
2017-04-14 15:50:51 UTC
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Post by Gary McGath
I would rhyme "craig," plague," and "vague" together, and put all the
others in a second rhyming group. I say "craig" with a slightly shorter
sound than the other two, but the difference isn't enough to disqualify
it as a rhyme.
I'm from New England, in case this is a regional issue.
Agree.

I wa born in Los Angeles, as were my parents.

My mother's parents grew up in Chicago (after four years in Lithuanian
and then three years in London) and Sioux City (after thirteen years in
Russia) -- and then moved to Los Angeles.
My father's parents died before he married. His father grew up in
Germany, then moved to Colorado and then moved to Los Angeles. His
mother was born in St. Louis but frequently visited her family in
Virginia before moving with her brother to Los Angeles. Her family had
been in Virginia before 1840.

--Lee
Lee Gold XP
2017-04-14 15:44:37 UTC
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Post by Arthur T.
Here's a short alphabetized list of words. I'm curious which
you think rhyme with each other. So as not to prejudice you, I'll
give my answers later, along with my reason for asking.
beg
craig
egg
greg
keg
leg
meg
peg
plague
vague
beg, egg, greg, keg, leg, meg rhyme with one another

Craig rhymes with plague and vague and with the non-Dutch pronunciation
of the Hague.

I like http://www.rhymezone.com.

--Lee
Arthur T.
2017-04-15 05:27:09 UTC
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Post by Arthur T.
Here's a short alphabetized list of words. I'm curious which
you think rhyme with each other. So as not to prejudice you, I'll
give my answers later, along with my reason for asking.
beg
craig
egg
greg
keg
leg
meg
peg
plague
vague
First, thanks to all who answered (or will answer).

My groupings:
beg, greg, keg, meg, peg

craig, egg, leg, plague, vague

I was listening to a song, and could not figure out what one of
the words was. Fortunately for me, that word was in the title. The
word was "peg", pronounced to rhyme with "vague" (i.e. with a long A
sound).

As you see, I do pronounce two "eg" words with long A sounds,
but not that one. I'd recognize "egg" & "leg" pronounced with short
Es, but I didn't recognize "peg" pronounced with a long A.

There's an old Bizarro panel with the word balloon, "He was
pronounced dead at the scene. He will be buried in Mississippi, where
he will be pronounced 'day-ed.'" If you notice, that doesn't replace
the short E with a long A, but prepends the long A to the short E.

I asked my most convenient dictionary how to pronounce PEG, and
it said to use the vowel in "egg", as it did for all of the other
"eg" words; that did not help me. But it also said that was the same
vowel in "best" and "dead", so I think that dictionary agrees with
all of you.

I'm from Philly, and I know we do unusual things with our As,
but this is the first time I came across this oddity with Es. I'll
be asking some local friends about this word list, too.
--
Arthur T. - ar23hur "at" pobox "dot" com
Mark Mandel
2017-04-15 05:41:06 UTC
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(sorted before I saw your list)

beg, egg, greg, keg, leg, meg, peg
Craig, plague, vague

Mark
Rick Hewett
2017-04-15 07:41:18 UTC
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Post by Mark Mandel
beg, egg, greg, keg, leg, meg, peg
Craig, plague, vague
...unless the bearer of the name "Craig" indicated they preferred a
different pronunciation of their name, of course.
--
..Rick Hewett http://www.hewett.org/
"I thought it was going to be bucket-of-water time myself."
-- Gaspode's way of saying "I'm sorry, was I intruding?"
(Terry Pratchett, Moving Pictures)
Kay Shapero
2017-04-17 05:44:22 UTC
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Post by Arthur T.
Here's a short alphabetized list of words. I'm curious which
you think rhyme with each other. So as not to prejudice you, I'll
give my answers later, along with my reason for asking.
beg
craig
egg
greg
keg
leg
meg
peg
plague
vague
Before looking at the other comments: definitely beg, egg, greg, keg,
leg, meg and peg. Plague and craig sorta rhyme.

Let me guess, this is a regional accent quiz? :)
--
Kay Shapero
FAQ at http://www.kayshapero.net/filkfaq.htm
Address munged, use kay at kayshapero extension as per website.
D. Glenn Arthur Jr.
2017-06-02 07:27:56 UTC
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Post by Arthur T.
Here's a short alphabetized list of words. I'm curious which
you think rhyme with each other. So as not to prejudice you, I'll
give my answers later, along with my reason for asking.
beg
craig
egg
greg
keg
leg
meg
peg
plague
vague
Plague & vague, usually -- my pronunciation of the 'g' in vague can
drift a smidgen towards a gamma sometimes.

Beg, Greg, keg, leg, meg, & peg, I would use as rhymes without a
second thought. Egg too, after a pause to decide (the 'gg' feels
different in my mouth, but I can't figure out how to describe it,
and it's not really different to my ear, just in my mouth).

It would probably not occur to me to rhyme Craig with any of these,
because the vowel sound stretches a little longer -- like 'ehg'
instead if 'eg' for the e-sound version, and 'aiyg' instead of 'ayg'
for the a-sound version (both of which I'm used to hearing and
saying). Also, the a-sound Craig has a very hard cut-off at the
end, but plague and vague have, um, like a pianissimo schwa grace-
note after the 'g'. But if somebody else used it to rhyme with leg
it wouldn't jar me out of the flow of reading or listening to
something. If used as a rhyme for plague, I'd blink -- jolted out
of the flow and conscious of mechanics for a moment -- but not get
derailed.

Rhyming egg with plague would work (maybe a little jarringly) if I
were listening to a piece recited in a Scottish accent, but not very
easily if I were reading it.

My ear: raised in central Maryland by a Greek Cypriot mother with
a slight English accent, and a northern-Virginia-accent father ...
but curiously I do not have quite the same accent as my siblings
and I don't know why. Early reader. Exposed to a bunch of non-local
accents. High school French, a little ancient Greek, teensy tiny
bit of modern Greek.
--
D. Glenn Arthur Jr./The Human Vibrator, ***@panix.com
Due to hand/wrist problems my newsreading time varies so I may miss followups.
"Being a _man_ means knowing that one has a choice not to act like a 'man'."
http://www.dglenn.org/ http://dglenn.dreamwidth.org
Kate Gladstone
2017-06-06 16:38:20 UTC
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All except "plague" and "vague" rhyme with one another; "plague" and "vague" rhyme with each other but not with the rest.
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